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Operational Security Management in Violent Environments - Hard Copy

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Please note that this product is available free of charge to Humanitarian Staff.


Since the publication of the first edition of Good Practice Review 8 on Operational Security Management in Violent Environments a decade ago, the global security environment has changed significantly. New conflict contexts have created new sources of threat to international humanitarian action. Increasing violence against aid workers and their operations, including more kidnappings and lethal attacks, has had serious implications for humanitarian relief work in insecure contexts. Meanwhile, agencies themselves have become much more conscious of the need to provide for the safety and security of their staff.

 

To reflect these changes, the Humanitarian Practice Network has published a new version of GPR 8. The new edition both updates the original material and introduces new topics, such as the security dimensions of ‘remote management’ programming, good practice in interagency security coordination and how to track, share and analyse security information. The new edition also provides a more comprehensive approach to managing critical incidents, in particular kidnapping and hostage-taking, and discusses issues relating to the threat of terrorism.


Language: English

Keywords: Conflict, violence & peace, Protection, human rights & security, Working in conflict setting

Agency: ODI - Overseas Development Institute

Author(s): Koenraad van Brabant

Date published: 1 December 2010

Pages: 309


Contents

 

  • Authorship and acknowledgements xi
  • Disclaimer xv
  • Glossary of security terms xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Section 1
  • Key Concepts and Principles

Chapter 1 Key concepts and principles of security management

  • 1.1 Why manage security risks? 7
  • 1.2 Organisational security management 12
  • 1.3 Interagency security management 17
  • 1.4 Transferring security risks 21
  • 1.5 The host country and security management 23

 


Chapter 2 Risk assessment 

 

  • 2.1 The importance of systematic risk assessment 27
  • 2.2 Key definitions 28
  • 2.3 Context analysis: know where you are 30
  • 2.4 Programme analysis: know who you are and what you want to do 35
  • 2.5 Threat assessment 38
  • 2.6 Vulnerability assessment 42
  • 2.7 Risk analysis 46


 

Chapter 3 Security strategy 

 

  • 3.1 Developing a security strategy 55
  • 3.2 Acceptance 57
  • 3.3 Protection 71
  • 3.4 Deterrence and armed protection 73

 

Chapter 4 Evacuation, hibernation, remote management programming and return

 

  • 4.1 Evacuation and relocation 83
  • 4.2 Hibernation 93
  • 4.3 Remote management programming 94
  • 4.4 Return 99


 

Chapter 5 Incident reporting and critical incident management 

 

  • 5.1 The importance of incident reporting and monitoring 101
  • 5.2 Critical incident management 103
  • 5.3 Post-incident management 107

 


Chapter 6 People in security management 

 

  • 6.1 Field-level security managers 111
  • 6.2 Personal competence 115
  • 6.3 Team competence 118
  • 6.4 Differentiating threats and risks for different types of staff 120
  • 6.5 Human resources 125
  • 6.6 Stress and stress management 128


Chapter 7 Managing communications security 

 

 

  • 7.1 Telecommunications 141
  • 7.2 Protecting communications equipment 153
  • 7.3 Information security 154
  • 7.4 Dealing with the media 159

 


Chapter 8 Travel and movement security 165

 

  • 8.1 Security on arrival 165
  • 8.2 Vehicles and security on the road 167
  • 8.3 Road travel: incident preparedness and incident response 176
  • 8.4 Travel by aircraft and boat 178
  • 8.5 A checklist for staff preparation 179

 

Chapter 9 Site security 

9.1 Site selection 181

9.2 Physical perimeter reinforcement 184

9.3 Site security management 187

9.4 Areas under terrorist threat 192

9.5 Counter-surveillance 194

9.6 Distribution sites 195


Chapter 10 Crowds, mobs and looting  

 

  • 10.1 Situational monitoring and analysis 197
  • 10.2 Preventive action 198
  • 10.3 Protection 199

 

Chapter 11 Cash security 

 

  • 11.1 Reducing the use of cash 203
  • 11.2 Discretion 203
  • 11.3 Limiting exposure 204
  • 11.4 Electronic money security 206
  • 11.5 Cash programming 207

 

Chapter 12 Sexual aggression  

 

  • 12.1 Definitions and scope 209
  • 12.2 Risk reduction 210
  • 12.3 Surviving sexual assault 213
  • 12.4 Crisis management 215
  • 12.5 Preparation and training 223

 

Chapter 13 Detention, arrest and abduction 

 

  • 13.1 Terminology 225
  • 13.2 Risk reduction 226
  • 13.3 Incident response and crisis management 226

 

Chapter 14 Kidnapping and hostage situations 

 

  • 14.1 Definitions 229
  • 14.2 Risk reduction 229
  • 14.3 Surviving a kidnapping or hostage situation 232
  • 14.4 Critical incident management 235
  • 14.5 Communicating and negotiating with the captors 243
  • 14.6 Managing the aftermath of a kidnapping 247
  • 14.7 Preparation and training 249

 

Chapter 15 Combat-related threats and remnants of war 

 

  • 15.1 Core questions 253
  • 15.2 Shelling and bombing 253
  • 15.3 Crossfire and sniper fire 258
  • 15.4 Mines, booby traps and unexploded ordnance 260
  • 15.5 White phosphorus 268
  • 15.6 Remnants of war: a reminder 268

 


Annexes

Annex 1 Global trends in aid worker security 273

Annex 2 The United Nations security management system 278

Annex 3 Saving Lives Together: a framework for security collaboration 282

Annex 4 Private security providers 286

Annex 5 Insurance 291

Annex 6 Donor funding and security management 295

Annex 7 Additional resources 298


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